HeirOfByzantium

"Audentes fortuna iuuat" _Virgil

fuckyeahbyzantines:

Built around the year 1000, the church of Hosios Loukas (Saint Luke for those of you English speakers) was a product of the thriving Byzantine monastic movement.  Many citizens of the empire contributed to this movement, either financially or by spending part of their lives in a monastery or convent.
In the Eastern Roman Empire, as in the far east, it was common for older people to join a holy community as sort of a way of preparing for the afterlife.  But true champions of the faith embraced this lifestyle at a much earlier age.  The tenth-century saint for whom the church of Hosios Loukas is named left his parents at the age of 14 to join other monks.  In time, a longing for solitude led him to a rugged hillside in Phocis where ancient Greeks had once worshipped the goddess Demeter.  There, Loukas/Luke passed his last 8 years in a small cell, visited now and again by pilgrims, and acquiring a reputation as a healer and prophet.  Before his death in 943, it was said, he foretold the liberation of Crete from Muslim control.  When that prophecy was fulfilled in 961, Loukas/Luke’s reputation soared, and powerful patrons offered their support to the monastic community that had grown up around his dwelling.  By one account, the church that arose there drew support from Basil II.
A fitting monument to power and piety, the building projected a fortress-like solidity, relieved by a host of graceful arches and windows that threw light on the sacred images housed within.  Wrought of stone, brick, and tile, the exterior of Hosios Loukas reveals the building’s symbolic plan - a cross within a square, with the cross defined by the gable transepts projecting from the central dome.  Hosios Loukas has endured as a shining example of Byzantine church architecture.

fuckyeahbyzantines:

Built around the year 1000, the church of Hosios Loukas (Saint Luke for those of you English speakers) was a product of the thriving Byzantine monastic movement.  Many citizens of the empire contributed to this movement, either financially or by spending part of their lives in a monastery or convent.

In the Eastern Roman Empire, as in the far east, it was common for older people to join a holy community as sort of a way of preparing for the afterlife.  But true champions of the faith embraced this lifestyle at a much earlier age.  The tenth-century saint for whom the church of Hosios Loukas is named left his parents at the age of 14 to join other monks.  In time, a longing for solitude led him to a rugged hillside in Phocis where ancient Greeks had once worshipped the goddess Demeter.  There, Loukas/Luke passed his last 8 years in a small cell, visited now and again by pilgrims, and acquiring a reputation as a healer and prophet.  Before his death in 943, it was said, he foretold the liberation of Crete from Muslim control.  When that prophecy was fulfilled in 961, Loukas/Luke’s reputation soared, and powerful patrons offered their support to the monastic community that had grown up around his dwelling.  By one account, the church that arose there drew support from Basil II.

A fitting monument to power and piety, the building projected a fortress-like solidity, relieved by a host of graceful arches and windows that threw light on the sacred images housed within.  Wrought of stone, brick, and tile, the exterior of Hosios Loukas reveals the building’s symbolic plan - a cross within a square, with the cross defined by the gable transepts projecting from the central dome.  Hosios Loukas has endured as a shining example of Byzantine church architecture.

viktor-sbor:

Ефошкин Сергей.” На битву. XIV век”

viktor-sbor:

Ефошкин Сергей.” На битву. XIV век”

(via ras-kolnikova)

hellas-inhabitants:

Traditional clothing of Maroussi decorated at the hem with special colorful embroidered pattern prevailing attire Northern Attica, the Mastrapas. (19th c. Till early 20th century.).
Παραδοσιακή ενδυμασία του Αμαρουσίου διακοσμημένη στον ποδόγυρο με το ιδιαίτερο πολύχρωμο κεντητό σχέδιο που επικρατεί στην ενδυμασία της Βορείου Αττικής, τον μαστραπά. (19ος αι. έως αρχές 20ου αι.).

hellas-inhabitants:

Traditional clothing of Maroussi decorated at the hem with special colorful embroidered pattern prevailing attire Northern Attica, the Mastrapas. (19th c. Till early 20th century.).

Παραδοσιακή ενδυμασία του Αμαρουσίου διακοσμημένη στον ποδόγυρο με το ιδιαίτερο πολύχρωμο κεντητό σχέδιο που επικρατεί στην ενδυμασία της Βορείου Αττικής, τον μαστραπά. (19ος αι. έως αρχές 20ου αι.).

(via mare-internum)

beldaran:

IN FACT, FORGET THE HEAVEN!

beldaran:

IN FACT, FORGET THE HEAVEN!

(Source: rami3l, via somehistoriancalledmike)

detailsorientedbyshapepluspace:

The Forgotten Palazzo, Milan

detailsorientedbyshapepluspace:

The Forgotten Palazzo, Milan

(via ras-kolnikova)

getyourspoons:

"I originally met Tommy in San Fransisco in an acting class, of all places and I watched him perform a Shakespearean sonnet. And I think everyone in the class was horrified." - Greg Sestero

(via thedudinator123)


Quite possibly the best/worst fortune cookie fortune ever.

Quite possibly the best/worst fortune cookie fortune ever.

(Source: funnyorwtf, via hashtagswaglol)

jeannepompadour:

Medieval men’s and women’s costumes from the 1300s-1400s

(via ras-kolnikova)